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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
meeting, from the breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
>> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't matter that much. that the leader of any organization faces external constraint. if you are a ceo of a c
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
this multinational. >> yes, tom, sound like it belongs in the medical business, but actually no it's really a science business. core labs, about a $5 billion company and they specialize in helping oil companies find more oil and more gas that benefits all around the world. so they have scientists who actually take samples of rock and water, analyze that and try to help oil companies find more oil that may be hidden or tucked away so we can abscess more oil, which is good for all of us. >> tom: we're talking about an energy boon in the united states, energy prices, that's helped keep a cap on energy prices here. what kind of holding time frame do you anticipate to make some money? >> as we've seen this year, one reason why core labs is attractive from a valuation perfect suspective we've seen the stock soften this year as some of the rig counts have softened as well because of the i prices of natural gas have really fallen. and i do think this will reverse sometime over the next few years and we'll see more rigs be put to use, and that's good for core labs, but to do that you really need to take that
where america worried about missiles, science spelled "national security." >> the cold war was prolonged, it was going on and no one could see an end to it, and there were underlying risks of nuclear confrontation. >> the next step in the race was manned launches that required a few good men, seven to start. >> there were 110 originally selected to become astronauts by the air force and navy and it became a list of 326789 i was the only guy to flunk. i had what was known as pink pigment in the blood and they said, well, you know, you are out. >> you said at time when you were a boy you were not into dinosaurs. >>guest: when i did not get in the original selection i was interested in rockets before they could spelt -- spell it. >> the goal was to put a human in orbit before the soviets. on the second count they failed and 3 1/2 years after the shock of april 12, 1961, the soviets outpaced the united states again when a cosmonaut was the first human being in space. >> they beat us into orbit so we were behind. we were lagging. >> america scrambled to catch up less than a month later, on ma
of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking act eisenhower. this segment is not going to be about ike, but it is -- we're just talking about presidents who rise and presidents who fall. eisenhower's on his way up by now. but you had, of course, lbj constantly drawing on johnson's -- on eisenhower's wisdom. >> and, you know, the great thing about eisenhower, too, was just that he was so popular among the people. that great song "i like ike, because ike is easy to like," no one else had such a good song. but lbj is rising, too, and i think it's about time that he does. he left under such a cloud, the scar in vietnam so, so painful at the time he
, the nobel laureate in economic science and got turned to the concept of public choice theory. that was another alarm bell for me because it gave me another perspective to -- in which to look at what was going on inside of washington. i thought very much that all of this would get solved because the problems were so immense that it seemed to me if i noticed this and did not come out of harvard or oxford that certainly the rest of the people in the industry would be as concerned or more concerned than i was about this. i knew enough about economics to understand the difference in structure, industry structure's competitive markets as compared to duopolies and monopolies and i knew when you had market structures that were in this case best statutory duopoly that it created a large dead weight loss. in the spring of 1996 i was invited by the m v a and i apologize if my voice oscillates a bit, i got out of an airplane and hour-and-a-half ago and my years have not yet popped but in any case i was invited to make a presentation as to the profitability of the mortgage banking industr
, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, didn't call it second base. whether or not the nature of dark matter will be first discovered by microphysicists rather than astrophysicists. it's all part of the speech and thought and belief that's protected by the first amendment. you can't think of it just in political terms. it's important. and there's a third dimension. speech is what allows you to define your persona, your personality. your speech, your thought, your beliefs or who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment cases has protected speech. that is hideous. we only get those cases we had a case recently protecting speech, videos, where it was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spikes heels killing little animals. we protected the oath. it was protected speech. we protected speech when on the day of a funeral of a service man killed in the middle east, there were protesters using derogatory words about gays, saying the military is all going to be doomed to predition bec
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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